Visitor Visa Australia

Subclass 600 is a general-purpose visa for visitors and is likely the most widely used visitor visa for Australia. It suites the need for prospective tourists, business visitors and relatives of Australian residents. For citizens of certain counties, the cheaper and simpler Subclass 651 or Subclass 601 visas may be superior options to enter Australia.

When planning a visit to Australia, it is important to consider the duration and purpose of your travel. When it comes to applying for a subclass 600 visitor visa, Australia offers numerous streams of visitor visas dependent on one’s purpose. Applicants must apply for the correct stream of visitor visa in order to maximize their prospects of being permitted to enter Australia. The streams applicable to Subclass 600 are as follows:

  • Tourist
  • Sponsored Family
  • Business Visitor
  • Approved Destination
  • Frequent traveler

1315929 [2014] MRTA 1258 – Selecting the Wrong Stream

When preparing a visitor visa application in Australia, it is imperative to select the correct stream. An application under the wrong stream will be refused by the Department of Home Affairs. In the above case, the applicant erroneously applied for her visitor visa under the business stream. On appeal, the applicant conceded that she did not wish to travel to Australia for business and had selected the wrong stream. The Tribunal accepted that the applicant mistakenly selected the wrong stream in her visitor visa application. Unfortunately for the applicant, it was not open to the Tribunal to assess the visitor visa application under an alternative stream and so the appeal failed as a result.

From the above, it is clear that selecting the wrong stream will be fatal to your visitor visa and your travel to Australia. Identifying the correct stream is contingent on a range of factors, ranging from the purpose of your visitor visa to whether you are applying from inside or outside Australia. Don’t risk a refusal from the Department of Home Affairs, get the right advice on your visitor visa and maximize the prospect of successful travel to Australia.

Do I need a Visitors Visa for Australia?

Unlike many countries around the world, Australia does not offer visa free, or visa on arrival options to many applicants. With the notable exception of New Zealand, citizens of any other country must obtain a visa in order to lawfully travel to Australia. Generally a visitor visa will be issued for multiple months, but will generally only allow for a period of 3 months stay per entry. In such cases, you may need to travel outside Australia and reenter to renew this period. Whilst there are numerous visa options are available, they must be obtained before you travel to Australia.

To identify the right visa for your stay, it is best to obtain guidance from a registered migration agent. Applying for the wrong visa, whether the 600 visa or otherwise, will either result in a visa refusal or delay your travels to Australia.

Visitation and Working in Australia

For any visitor visa, Australia will not permit an applicant to work during heir stay. With the exception of extraordinarily compelling circumstances, it is not possible visit Australia on a visitor visa and simply request lifting of applicable work restrictions. As the Department of Home Affairs requires you to prove in your application that you can afford your stay, it is generally not accepted that visitor visa holders in Australia be expected to need the right to work to support themselves financially. It is certainly not possible to preemptively remove work restrictions whilst outside Australia. If you are looking to do more than merely visit Australia, and want to travel to Australia for work, a visitor visa is not the appropriate pathway.

Other Visitor Visa Options

When it comes to obtaining a visitor visa, Australian offers streamlined options to passport holders from select countries, such as Hong Kong, the United States and most of Europe. Of particular note are the Subclass 651 and Subclass 601 visas which differ in terms of the eligible types of passport holders. Both these Australian visa options offer a streamlined application process, with applications consisting of little more than inputting the details of your travel documents, particularly your passport.

Said visitor visas also permit undertaking business visitor activities as part of your travel to Australia, in addition to touristic activities and visitation of friends or family. Provided that your passport is issued by a specified country, and you have no adverse migration history from previous travel through Australia, you may not need to proceed with a subclass 600 visa for yourself or your family.

If you currently hold one of the above mentioned visas to Australia, it is mot possible to apply for a new 651 or 601 visa after you have entered Australia. An application to extend one’s stay will need to be achieved though a visitor visa, subclass 600.

Subclass 651 is available to citizens of the following countries:

  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • The Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Republic of San Marino
  • Slovak Republic
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom – British Citizen
  • Vatican City
(Note that British National Overseas, British Dependent Territories Citizen, British Overseas Citizen, British Protected Person or British Subject passport holders are not eligible)

Subclass 601 is available to citizens of the following countries:

  • Andorra
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Brunei
  • Canada
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hong Kong (SAR of China)
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Liechtenstein
  • Luxembourg
  • Malaysia
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • Norway
  • Portugal
  • Republic of San Marino
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan (excluding official or diplomatic passports)
  • The Netherlands
  • United Kingdom—British Citizen
  • United Kingdom—British National (Overseas)
  • United States of America
  • Vatican City

For both the 651 and 601 visas, only citizens of the above countries are eligible. Passports issued to non-citizens by these countries, such as humanitarian or laissez-passer passports, will not satisfy the requirements for either visa and will not be accepted by the Department of Home Affairs. In short, the nationality listen on your passport must be for the country issuing the passport.

If you are a New Zealand permanent resident, the Australian government has not implemented any special rights to visitor visas in order visit Australia. The options for visitor visas remain contingent on your country of passport.

  • Tourist
  • Sponsored Family
  • Business Visitor
  • Approved Destination
  • Frequent traveler
  • Extending your Stay

    If you are are currently the holder of a visitor visa, including if you are the holder of a Subclass 651 eVisitor visa or Subclass 601 electronic travel authority, the subclass 600 visa may allow you to stay longer in certain circumstances. Holders of 601 and 651 visas must apply for the subclass 600 visa as it is not possible to obtain an eVisitor or electronic travel authority visa whilst physically present in Australia.

    An application of this sort will generally be carefully scrutinized by the Department of home affairs, particularly if your home country is not comparable to Australia in regards to economic opportunity. All sorts of information is taken into account, including:

    • The economic and political situation in your home country
    • Whether you are responsible for the care of any dependent family members in your home country
    • Whether you are employed in your home country
    • Whether you own any major assets in your home country
    • Whether you need to return to your home country to continue any ongoing studies
    • Your previous history of compliance with migration laws, including previous travels in Australia

    Any concern regarding your intentions in applying for an onshore 600 visa will likely draw the suspicion of the Department of Home Affairs.

    If you are concerned that your application form may be rejected, it is pivotal to seek information from a migration expert in order to identify the best way to stay longer in Australia.

    Application Charges

    The visa application charge for visitor visas is dependent on the stream specific in your application.

    Frequent Traveler Stream: $1,065

    Other Stream;

    • If you are in Australia: $365
    • If you are outside Australia: $145

    Note: If your are in Australia and have applied for a temporary visa in Australia before, you may be required to pay an additional “subsequent temporary application charge” of $700.

    Common Criteria

    Regardless of the stream you plan to apply under, there are some criteria that must be satisfied by all applicants seeking to obtain a visitor visa of this sort. Failure of any one of the below listed prerequisites will be grounds of refusal irrespective of the stream you apply for.

    This common criteria is outlined below:

    Genuine Temporary Entrant:

    Failure to meet the genuine temporary entrant requirement is the most common cause of refusal and should not be taken lightly. To satisfy this prerequisite you must demonstrate to the Department that you intend to depart from Australia at the conclusion of your visitor visa. In other words, you must prove that you wish to remain in Australia on a temporary basis and will return to your home country at the conclusion of your visit. In short, travel to Australia as a visitor will not be possible unless the Australian Government is satisfied you pose no risk of overstay.

    The way this is assessed by the department is influenced by your country of citizenship and your personal circumstances. If you are from a developing country, the Department may be concerned that you may overstay on your visa to Australia and not depart at the conclusion of your visitor visa. If you are from such a country, it is extremely important to provide evidence demonstrating to the Department that you are required to return home before the expiry of your Australian visa.

    The factors which may be considered by the Department of Home Affairs when assessing one’s subclass 600 visitor visa application include:

    • One’s past substantial compliance with the conditions to which your past visas were subject, including bridging visas.
    • Whether the Department of Home Affairs is satisfied the one intends to comply with the conditions that would be attached to one’s visitor visa, subclass 600, if granted.
    • Any other relevant matter.

    As can be gleamed from the above, a visitor visa for Australia will depend on your past compliance with Australian migration laws as well as any other factor or information which may influence your likelihood to overstay on or be in breach of your visitor visa, subclass 600.

    Case Study - Satisfying the Genuine Temporary Entrant Criterion

    As stated previously, when assessing a visitor visa, Australia places significant emphasis on the applicant’s circumstances outside Australia. This has resulted in the Department of Home Affairs recusing many a visitor visa and many applications reaching the Administrative Appeals Tribunal. These decisions shed great light no how visitor visa applications are assessed for the genuine temporary entrant criterion and helps elucidate the prospects of yourself or your family or friends securing a visitor visa for Australia.

    1404364 [2015] MRTA 432 – Success in the Face of Civil War

    The above matter concerned a Syrian national who was refused her visitor visa, subclass 600. The woman had intended to visit Australia to see her grandchildren and other Australian family members, however her country of citizenship was cause for major concern to the Department of Home Affairs. In short, her status as a Syrian citizen, coupled with the ongoing civil war in her country, was thought to provide the applicant with enormous incentive to remain in Australian after the expiry of her visitor visa, subclass 600.

    In many such cases, an ongoing armed conflict in an applicant’s country of citizenship will form grounds for refusal by the Department of Home Affairs. As could be expected, the application in question was unsuccessful at first instance with the Department of Home Affairs citing civil and political unrest in Syria as forming significant incentive for the visa applicant to overstay her visa or apply for refugee status. On appeal, however, the applicant was able to substantiate her satisfaction of the genuine temporary entrant criterion.

    The Tribunal held that the applicant satisfied the criteria for grant of a visitor visa, subclass 600, on the basis of mitigating factors which offset the obvious concerns of the Department of Home Affairs. These factors included:

    • The members of the applicant’s family unit who were not accompanying her during her travel to Australia.
    • The relative stability of her home city of Tartous, which had been largely spared from the Syrian Civil War.
    • Her and her husband’s ownership of various properties and businesses in Syria.
    • The applicant’s history of compliance with migration laws, including her travels to Saudi Arabia for the Haj.

    As demonstrated from the above, even in the most extreme circumstances, such as civil war, it may nevertheless be possible to satisfy the genuine temporary entrant requirement and obtain an visitor visa, subclass 600. Depending on the particulars of the situation, nationals of any country may successfully apply for visitor visas for Australia.

    400968 [2014] MRTA 2528 – 4 Relatives and only 1 Successful Appeal

    The above matter concerns 4 related visa applicants, of Indian nationality, who had been sponsored by an Australian permanent resident family member. In coming to its decision, the tribunal assessed the personal circumstances of each family member separately. The level of scrutiny was heightened on the basis of the high number of Indian visa applicants who have historically overstayed their visitor visa for Australia or applied for refugee status. Three applicants failed to satisfy the requisite application criteria whilst the fourth established her eligibility for an Australian visa.

    The parents of the family sponsor had the refusal of their visitor visa for Australia upheld and were unsuccessful in their appeal. Neither parent had ever traveled outside of India and both subsisted on the proceeds of their dairy farm. The Tribunal cited the following factors as among the reasons for their decision;

    • The applicants had never previously left their native country, had so had no history of prior compliance with migration laws, whether pursuant to an Australian visa or otherwise.
    • The applicants ostensibly did not have adequate means of support for the purpose of their visitation.
    • The Tribunal was concerned that the applicant’s dairy far could not be left unattended for the 2 month visitor visa sought.

    The brother of the family sponsor was likewise refused. As a single, 26 year old unemployed engineer, working at his father’s dairy farm, the Tribunal held he had insufficient ties to India to provide incentives to depart upon the expiry of his visa for Australia.

    The sister of the family sponsor was successful in obtaining a visa into Australia. With a husband and soon-to-be adoptive child remaining outside Australia, the Tribunal deemed the presence of these family members sufficient to satisfy the Australian visa requirements.

    From the above, two factors become clear. Firstly, in determining the risk that an applicant poses of extending their stay, the past conduct of the applicant’s compatriots is key. Indeed, the citizen of a country whose nationals demonstrate a propensity to stay beyond the limits of their visa for Australia or make an application for protection, will be cause for concern to the Department of Home Affairs. Secondly, the analysis of an application will focus on information concerning the personal circumstances of the applicant in his or her home country. Passport holders from the same country, even if wishing to visit Australia to see the same family or friends, will differ greatly in how their Australian visa application is assessed by the authorities.

    Means of Support:

    You must show that you have access to sufficient funds to finance your travel. If the Department does not consider that you can financially afford your trip, your application will be refused. It is therefore important to provide evidence of how you are planning to pay for your trip when preparing your visa application.

    If someone else is paying for your travel, this may potentially cause complications. The Department of Home Affairs may even factor in the capacity of an applicant to support him or herself in assessing the genuine temporary entrant requirement also. This can be the cases even where a family member is being sponsored by an Australian citizen. Of particular concern is where the sponsoring family member is the applicant’s partner, as the Department of Home Affairs may suspect that you are not a genuine temporary entrant and will apply for an onshore partner visa once you visit Australia. Some applicants undertaking business visitor activities will have a sponsoring business entity listed as financier in the visa application, however, similar concerns exist with regards to unlawful work in such instances.

    In short, an application is best positioned for success where the visitor visa applicant is themselves paying to visit Australia. Information of this sort should be affixed the the application, showing that the applicant can fund their stay and the stay of any accompanying family member.

    Limitation on Stay - 12 Months

    In some cases, you may apply for a visitor visa while you are in Australia whilst on a different temporary visa. If granting your visitor visa would result in you staying in Australia for more than 12 months in the last 18 months, your application will likely be refused. As stated above, 651 and 601 visa holders must avail themselves of the 600 visitor visa to extend their stay without traveling outside Australia.

    If you have already been in Australia for a total of 12 months in the last two years, you will likely need to remain outside Australia until you meet the requirements. A visitor visa to travel to Australia beyond this 12 months duration will likely not be issued by the Department of Home Affairs if requested. This criterion applies to passport holders of all countries, regardless of whether or not the country of citizenship of said passport holders is “high risk” or otherwise.

    If you are looking to extend your stay beyond a combined total of 12 months or more, you may need to demonstrate “exceptional circumstances” justifying the grant. Simply wanting a longer stay to visit family or undertake more business visitor activities will simply not suffice on its own. What constitutes “exceptional circumstances” is highly technical and is best identified by a migration solicitor. If you or your family member needs to extend their stay through a new visitor visa for Australia, be sure to obtain the necessary information from a registered migration agent.

    Relevant Public Interest Criteria

    All applicants for a visitor visa in Australia must satisfy the following:

    4001 – Passes character test.

    4002 – Not a security risk.

    4003 – Not adverse to foreign policy objectives.

    4004 – No outstanding debts owed to the Commonwealth of Australia.

    4005 – Passes medical assessment.

    4011 – No proscribed risk factors.

    4013 – No proscribed risk factors.

    4014 – No proscribed risk factors.

    4020 – No provision of false or misleading information.

    4021 – Holds a valid passport.

    Applicants under the age of 18 must also satisfy the following:

    4012 – Is accompanied or has made proscribed arrangements.

    4017 – No legal impediment in home country.

    4018 – Not against best interest of the child.

    Relevant Special Return Criteria:

    Special return criteria 5001, 5002 and 5010 are applicable.

    Tourist Stream

    For most applicants looking to come to Australia as a tourist, the tourist stream is generally the most appropriate. Applicants under this stream must be looking to undertake a genuine touristic visit, which may include wanting to visit family. Upon grant, this type of 600 visitor visa will permit you to visit Australia for up to three (3) months for sightseeing, attending events or any other form of tourism.

    To qualify for this stream, you must satisfy the following:

    • You must be planning to undertake a genuine touristic visit, which may include visitation of family or friends.
    • If your application is sponsored by a proscribed relative, said sponsorship is approved and any required security deposit has been supplied.

    Touristic Visit

    Applications made under the tourist stream must be for a permitted purpose. This purpose may be for tourism or to visit certain people in Australia. You cannot apply under this stream if you intend to receive medical treatment or engage in business activities whilst in Australia.

    It is generally advisable that visitor visa applicants substantiate their touristic activities in their application. Passport holders from “high-risk” countries are particularly vulnerable to application refusal if the Department of Home Affairs be unconvinced by the travel itinerary. The activities and accommodation that will form part of your travel to Australia are best evidenced in your application in order to expressly outline the purpose of your visitor visa. Contrived, vague or inconsistent travel itineraries will likely rouse the suspicion of the Department of Home Affairs and result in the refusal of your visitor visa. Simply providing a timeline with a list of arbitrarily selected tourist destinations will likely be unconvincing for this purpose.

    Furthermore, if you are applying onshore and hold or had held a student visa, you cannot utilise this stream to finish off a course of study or start a new course. This prohibition includes any study that you were unable to complete whilst on a Subclass 500 student visa. If you are looking to finish off a course of study, you must undertake a new Subclass 500 student visa application.

    Family Sponsorship and Security Bonds

    In some cases, the Department may request that you will be sponsored by a relative who is an Australian citizen or permanent resident. Such a request is rare, as it is often preferred by the Department of Home Affairs to simply refuse such an application, but may nevertheless occur where there is concern that you may not return to your home country. Where such a concern exists, the Department may request a security bond from the sponsoring relative. This relative will generally need to be your parent, child, sibling or partner. It is not acceptable to the Department of Home Affairs to have a mere friend or associate provide the security bond.

    The amount of the bond may vary. In extreme cases, a relative may be requested to give as much as $5,000 or more for this purpose. This bond is fully repaid to your family member if you leave Australia before your visa expires. If you fail to comply with your visitor visa or apply for another substantive visa once in Australia, the bond will not be refunded.

    If you are not a prospective visa applicant and have instead been requested to sponsor a relative for a visa under this stream, it is important to obtain legal advice and understand the risks associated with such action. Australian citizens and permanent residents must be made aware that should a visa holder stay beyond the validity of their visitor visa for Australia, any bond paid will be lost. When it comes to sponsorship for a visitor visa, Australia will hold a sponsor accountable for their endorsement.

    Despite the ability of the Department of Home Affairs to request a bond from a family member, the Australian government will often refuse visit visa, subclass 600, applications where there are concerns about the genuine temporary entrant criterion. Depending of the applicant’s country of passport, the bond system cannot simply be relied upon to permit an applicant to travel to Australia and visit family or friends. Passport holders from “high-risk” countries must carefully address the genuine temporary entrant criteria in their application.

    Visa Conditions

    If you are being sponsored by family members, the Department will impose the following visa conditions:

    • 8101: The holder must not engage in work in Australia.
    • 8201: While in Australia, the holder must not engage, for more than 3 months, in any studies or training.
    • 8503: The holder will not, after entering Australia, be entitled to be granted a substantive visa, other than a protection visa, while the holder remains in Australia.
    • 8531: The holder must not remain in Australia after the end of the period of stay permitted by the visa.

    If the applicant is not sponsored and is not suffering financial hardship, the Department will impose the following conditions:

    • 8101: The holder must not engage in work in Australia.
    • 8201: While in Australia, the holder must not engage, for more than 3 months, in any studies or training.

    If the applicant is not sponsored and is not suffering financial hardship, the Department may impose the following visa conditions:

    • 8501: The holder must maintain adequate arrangements for health insurance while the holder is in Australia.
    • 8503: The holder will not, after entering Australia, be entitled to be granted a substantive visa, other than a protection visa, while the holder remains in Australia.
    • 8558: The holder must not stay in Australia for more than 12 months in any period of 18 months.

    If the applicant is not sponsored and is suffering financial hardship, the Department will impose the following visa conditions:

    • 8201: While in Australia, the holder must not engage, for more than 3 months, in any studies or training.

    If the applicant is not sponsored and is suffering financial hardship, the Department may impose the following visa conditions:

    • 8503: The holder will not, after entering Australia, be entitled to be granted a substantive visa, other than a protection visa, while the holder remains in Australia.

    Sponsored Family Stream

    The sponsored family stream provides opportunities for Australian citizens and permanent residents to invite their relatives to visit them in Australia for a temporary period. The Department may request a bond from your Australian relative. This stream is slightly more lenient with regards to the genuine temporary entrant criterion.

    To qualify for this stream, you must satisfy the following:

    • You must be planning to undertake a genuine touristic visit.
    • Your application is sponsored by a proscribed person.
    • Said sponsorship is approved and any required security deposit has been supplied.

    Touristic Visit

    Applications made under the family sponsored stream must be for a permitted purpose. This purpose may be for tourism or to visit certain people in Australia. You cannot apply under this stream if you intend to receive medical treatment or engage in business activities whilst in Australia.

    Sponsorship and Security

    Under the family sponsored stream, an applicant must be invited and sponsored by a relative, or other proscribed person, who is a settled Australian citizen or permanent resident. The Department will also often request a security bond from said sponsor.

    Sponsors may include:

    • A relative of the applicant or a member of his or her dependents or partner.
    • A member of a Federal, State or Territory parliament.
    • A Federal, State or Territory agency.
    • A mayor.

    The amount of the security bond may vary. In extreme cases, a sponsor may be requested to give as much as $5,000 or more for this purpose. This bond is refunded fully if you leave Australia before your visa expires. If you fail to comply with your visitor visa or apply for another substantive visa once in Australia, the bond will not be refunded.

    If you are a relative and are thinking about providing a bond, make sure you seek independent legal advice to ensure you understand your obligations as a sponsor.

    "No Further Stay" Condition and the Sponsored Family Stream

    The 8503 “no further stay” condition prevents a visa holder from applying for an additional visa whilst in Australia. The purpose of this condition is to prevent visa holders from using a subclass 600 visa as a stepping stone to an eventual onshore permanent visa application. Whilst this condition is applicable to all streams of the Subclass 600 visa, it is mandatory on visas issued under the sponsored family stream. This fact is a major consideration for any potential applicant who may be looking to apply for an additional visa whilst in Australia. Whilst it is possible to waive this condition after the visa has been granted, it is often very difficult and requires strong legal argumentation to achieve.

    Relevant Public Interest Criteria

    Under this stream, all applicants for a visitor visa for Australia must satisfy the following:

    4001, 4002, 4003, 4004, 4005, 4011, 4013, 4014, 4020 and 4021.

    Applicants under the age of 18 must also satisfy the following:

    4012, 4017 and 4018.

    Relevant Special Return Criteria:

    5001, 5002 and 5010.

    Visa Conditions

    The following conditions must be imposed by the Department upon any visitor visa for Australia under this stream:

    • 8101: The holder must not engage in work in Australia.
    • 8201: While in Australia, the holder must not engage, for more than 3 months, in any studies or training.
    • 8503: The holder will not, after entering Australia, be entitled to be granted a substantive visa, other than a protection visa, while the holder remains in Australia.
    • 8531: The holder must not remain in Australia after the end of the period of stay permitted by the visa.

    Business Visitor Stream

    This stream is in place for applicants with intentions of entering Australia for touristic or business purposes. Business visitors are not permitted to work in Australia, but rather proscribed business activities. These activities exclude any activities undertaken in return for remuneration. Touristic activities are also permissible, so you are able to visit family or friends in addition to your business activities.

    In many cases, an applicant under this stream will be invited by an Australia business. Such an invitation may considerably improve the prospects of securing a grant under this stream, particularly where applicants are passport holders of otherwise “high risk” developing countries. An application will need to specify the business activities and, if applicable, identify the relevant business inside the country.

    Business Visitor Activity

    As mentioned above, visas granted under the business visitor stream permit both touristic and business visitor activities. Under regulation, “business visitor activities” may include:

    • Making general business or employment inquiries;
    • Investigating, negotiating, “entering into” or renewing business contracts;
    • Duties that are part of an official government visit;
    • Participation in a conference, trade fair, seminar or similar.

    The above definition expressly excludes the following three activities:

    • Undertaking work for, or supplying services to, an organization or other person based in Australia; or
    • Sale of goods or services directly to the general public.
    • Participation in any conference, trade fair, seminar or similar event in exchange for payment.

    Breech of a visa condition can have dire consequences for subsequent Australian visa applications. If you are unsure whether your intended activities are permissible under the business visitor stream, it is imperative that you seek information and advice from an experienced migration solicitor before proceeding with said activities.

    Visa Conditions

    Conditions that must be imposed include:

    • 8115: The holder must not work in Australia other than by engaging in a business visitor activity.
    • 8201: While in Australia, the holder must not engage, for more than 3 months, in any studies or training.

    Conditions that may be imposed include:

    • 8503: The holder will not, after entering Australia, be entitled to be granted a substantive visa, other than a protection visa, while the holder remains in Australia.

    Frequent Traveler Stream

    This stream is for passport holders of the People’s Republic of China who are looking to make repeated visits to Australia for touristic or business purposes. Only citizens of the People’s Republic of China may qualify for this stream. Other applicants should consider the business visitor stream in the alternative. This visa may be issued for a duration of up to 10 years, but:

    • Applicants can only stay in Australia for 3 months at a time; and
    • Applicants cannot be in Australia for more than 12 months total in any 2-year period.

    Requirements for this stream can be summarized as follows:

    • The applicant intends to visit Australia as a tourist or to engage in business visitor activities.
    • The applicant does not intend to engage in activities that will have adverse consequences for employment or training opportunities, or conditions of employment, for Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents.
    • The applicant is outside of Australia at the time of application.

    Approved Destination Status Stream

    This stream is restricted to passport holders of the People’s Republic of China who are looking to visit Australia as part of an organized tour group. Citizens of Chinese Special Administrative Regions, namely Hong Kong and Macau, are not eligible to apply under this stream.

    Only an approved travel agent located in the People’s Republic of China can facilitate applications under this stream. Most migration agents and solicitors in Australia will not be able to apply for this stream on your behalf. If you are a Chinese national looking to undertake a guided tour of Australia,